2378 - Joint Venture 2378 - Joint Venture 2378 - Joint Venture

Statistics Sub: 1164 | AC: 270 | AC%: 23,20 | Score: 1,38
Created by 2012 NWERC
Added by jmargilagos (2013-05-08)
Limits
Total Time: 45000 MS |Memory: 256 MB | Output: 64 MB | Size: 16 KB
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Description

Liesbeth and Jan are building a robot for a course project and have discovered that they need to fit two pieces of Lego into an opening.

The opening is x centimetres wide and the sum of the lengths of the two pieces has to be precisely equal to the width of the opening, or else the robot will break during the project demonstration, with catastrophic consequences for the grades of the two students.

Luckily, Liesbeth and Jan were able to sneak into the physics laboratory late one night to measure the lengths of their remaining Lego pieces very accurately. Now they just need to select two pieces that will fit the opening perfectly.
Liesbeth and Jan are building a robot for a course project and have discovered that they need to fit two pieces of Lego into an opening.

The opening is x centimetres wide and the sum of the lengths of the two pieces has to be precisely equal to the width of the opening, or else the robot will break during the project demonstration, with catastrophic consequences for the grades of the two students.

Luckily, Liesbeth and Jan were able to sneak into the physics laboratory late one night to measure the lengths of their remaining Lego pieces very accurately. Now they just need to select two pieces that will fit the opening perfectly.
Liesbeth and Jan are building a robot for a course project and have discovered that they need to fit two pieces of Lego into an opening.

The opening is x centimetres wide and the sum of the lengths of the two pieces has to be precisely equal to the width of the opening, or else the robot will break during the project demonstration, with catastrophic consequences for the grades of the two students.

Luckily, Liesbeth and Jan were able to sneak into the physics laboratory late one night to measure the lengths of their remaining Lego pieces very accurately. Now they just need to select two pieces that will fit the opening perfectly.

Input specification

For each test case, you get:
  • a line containing one positive integer: x, denoting the width of the opening in centimetres, with 1 <= x <= 20.
  • a line containing one non-negative integer: n, denoting the remaining number of Lego pieces Liesbeth and Jan have access to, with 0 <= n <= 1000000.
  • n lines containing positive integers l, denoting lengths of Lego pieces in nanometres. Liesbeth and Jan have told you that no piece of Lego is longer than 10 centimetres, or 100000000 nanometres.
For each test case, you get:
  • a line containing one positive integer: x, denoting the width of the opening in centimetres, with 1 <= x <= 20.
  • a line containing one non-negative integer: n, denoting the remaining number of Lego pieces Liesbeth and Jan have access to, with 0 <= n <= 1000000.
  • n lines containing positive integers l, denoting lengths of Lego pieces in nanometres. Liesbeth and Jan have told you that no piece of Lego is longer than 10 centimetres, or 100000000 nanometres.
For each test case, you get:
  • a line containing one positive integer: x, denoting the width of the opening in centimetres, with 1 <= x <= 20.
  • a line containing one non-negative integer: n, denoting the remaining number of Lego pieces Liesbeth and Jan have access to, with 0 <= n <= 1000000.
  • n lines containing positive integers l, denoting lengths of Lego pieces in nanometres. Liesbeth and Jan have told you that no piece of Lego is longer than 10 centimetres, or 100000000 nanometres.

Output specification

For each test case, a row containing the word "danger" if no two pieces of Lego exist that precisely fit into the opening, or "yes l1 l2", with l1 <= l2, should two such pieces of lengths l1 and l2 exist. In case multiple solutions exist, a solution maximising the difference between l1 and l2 must be printed.
For each test case, a row containing the word "danger" if no two pieces of Lego exist that precisely fit into the opening, or "yes l1 l2", with l1 <= l2, should two such pieces of lengths l1 and l2 exist. In case multiple solutions exist, a solution maximising the difference between l1 and l2 must be printed.
For each test case, you get:
  • a line containing one positive integer: x, denoting the width of the opening in centimetres, with 1 <= x <= 20.
  • a line containing one non-negative integer: n, denoting the remaining number of Lego pieces Liesbeth and Jan have access to, with 0 <= n <= 1000000.
  • n lines containing positive integers l, denoting lengths of Lego pieces in nanometres. Liesbeth and Jan have told you that no piece of Lego is longer than 10 centimetres, or 100000000 nanometres.

Sample input

1
4
9999998
1
2
9999999

Sample output

yes 1 9999999

Hint(s)

http://coj.uci.cu/24h/
http://coj.uci.cu/24h/
http://coj.uci.cu/24h/

Recommendation

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